Raphael Lemkin (1900-1959), a Polish lawyer of Jewish descent is responsible for coining the word genocide. Lemkin was so overwhelmed by the massacre of non-Turkish minorities in the Ottoman Empire, he drafted a resolution for a Genocide Convention treaty. On December 9, 1948, Lemkin's Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide was formally presented and adopted by the United Nations. In 1946 Lemkin wrote:

"By its very legal, moral and humanitarian nature, it [genocide] must be considered an international crime. The conscience of mankind has been shocked by this type of mass barbarity. There have been many instances of states expressing their concern about another state's treatment of its citizens. The United States rebuked the government of Czarist Russia as well as that of Rumania for the ghastly pogroms they instigated or tolerated. There was also diplomatic action in behalf of the Greeks and Armenians when they were being massacred by the Turks."

 

Reference: American Scholar, Volume 15, no. 2 (April 1946), p. 227-230

 

Winston Churchill (1874-1965) - British Statesman

“... Mustapha Kemal's Army ... celebrated their triumph by the burning of Smyrna to ashes and by a vast massacre of its Christian population...”

Churchill W, The Aftermath, New York, Charles Scribner's and Sons, 1929, p444

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